Bloodroot


White and shining

No longer hidden in brown

Smiles last all day long.

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)

Informaiton about the Bloodroot plant from The Missouri Botanical Garden (http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=m290)

“Typically rises 6-10″ tall and spreads over time in the wild to form large colonies on the forest floor. Each flower stalk typically emerges in spring wrapped by one palmate, deeply-scalloped, grayish-green, basal leaf. As the flower blooms, the leaf unfurls. Each flower stalk produces a solitary, 2″ wide, 8-10 petaled, 1.5″ diameter, white flower with numerous yellow center stamens. Flowers open up in sun but close at night, and are very short-lived (1-2 days). Leaves continue to grow in size after bloom (sometimes to as much as 9” across) and remain attractive until mid to late summer when the plant goes dormant. All parts of the plant exude a bright reddish-orange sap when cut, hence the common name. Sap was once used by Native Americans for dyes.”

Advertisements

About rhudgins

I have recently retired and moved to the mid-west. We are learning how to live with relatives near by and are having fun living by Old Man River. I enjoy Haiku and photography and weaving. I have black belt in Kenai, and Isshinryu karate From Harp Karate in Rochester, NY.
Image | This entry was posted in Flowers, General comments, Haiku, Images, Iowa, Nature Preserves, Poetry and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s